Episode 490. Shakespeare And Burlesque

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[vc_row full_width=”stretch_row” content_placement=”top” equal_height=”yes” parallax=”content-moving-fade” slider_images=”12004″ slider_animation=”fadeZoom” overlay_color=”rgba(0,0,0,0.2)” css=”.vc_custom_1512315432253{background-position: center;background-repeat: no-repeat;background-size: contain !important;}” anchor_link=”top”][vc_column width=”2/3″ offset=”vc_col-lg-offset-2″][rowshape type=”rowshape_4″ position=”bottom” height=”30″ color=”#2b272c”][rowshape type=”rowshape_4″ position=”bottom” height=”50″ color=”rgba(166,115,81,0.6)”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row full_width=”stretch_row” anchor_link=”intro” css=”.vc_custom_1451644722488{padding-top: 60px !important;padding-bottom: 100px !important;}”][vc_column][vc_empty_space height=”15px”][vc_column_text]”418ht+OpjjL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_Richard Schoch is Professor of Drama at Queen’s University in Belfast, and the author of “Not Shakespeare: Bardolatry and Burlesque in the 19th Century.” Richard was working at the Folger Shakespeare Library during our first week there and wrote a blog post about the history of Shakespearean parody. Spoiler alert: The Reduced Shakespeare Company is part of a noble historical tradition. Richard discusses the history of Shakespearean parody and points to examples of Shakespeare spoofing himself, the Golden Age of Shakespearean parody, surprising emotional turns, how parodies are sometimes the best way to see a thing afresh, the fun of gauging Shakespearean literacy, comparisons to Hamilton and the importance of agency, and allowing audiences to be co-creators of an event. (Length 20:00)[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]